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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Sat Mar 12, 2011 5:24 pm

Of my first editions, they're mostly first paperback editions. But I do have a few "first-first" editions (ie hardcover), though none of them are in the picture.
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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Michael
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Post by Michael » Mon Mar 14, 2011 10:22 am

I finally finished The Girl Who... series. I was very concerned after book two's less than wrapped up ending that I'd hate the end of the third if it were similar (since the author died and wouldn't be able to wrap up the loose ends). But the ending was pretty tidy and satisfying. Overall, though, the books were a bit long, but interesting. I'm glad I read them, but won't be putting them on my re-read list.
How do you know what kind of pictures they are if you're such a lay-dee?

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Post by Murder by Death » Mon Mar 14, 2011 2:33 pm

I've brought this up in The White Pawn's Airship Murder thread before, but I just finished re-reading Ronald Florence's "Zeppelin". So many twists and turns I had forgotten in this globe-trotting epic set aboard the Graf Zeppelin just prior to the start of WW II. The book is out of print, but should be available through Amazon and other book re-sellers.

For those of you who are interested in the days of luxury airship travel, and spy mysteries, this is a must.

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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Tue Mar 22, 2011 11:02 am

Here are some awesome book covers from my humble little collection:
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The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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Post by Jamie » Thu Mar 24, 2011 11:43 am

go_leafs_nation wrote:Here are some awesome book covers from my humble little collection:
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Any brief synopsis of them?

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Post by Black » Thu Mar 24, 2011 3:02 pm

I haven't done any reading in a while. But I recently picked this up.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5 ... AA240_.jpg

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Post by Jane Poirot » Thu Mar 24, 2011 4:25 pm

Ever read a book that had a very good beginning and middle, and then outright betrayed you in the end? For me, My Sister's Keeper was that book. The ending made me feel cheated and like I had wasted my time.
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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Thu Mar 24, 2011 4:35 pm

Ironically, most people were outraged that the movie apparently changed the ending. Not having read the book, I can't comment.

I'll write the summaries later today- as it happens, I have yet to read those books, but damn, I love those covers.
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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Post by Jane Poirot » Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:00 pm

Yeah, I did hear that the movie changed the ending--but from what I have heard, it is less of a cop out then the book's ending. Okay, to better explain it...(EDIT, gah I am a moron, the background IS white...hold on)

SPOILERS:

Which is more realistic--dying in a random car crash yet having your kidneys intact for a procedure that was already stated would do the patient no good and then putting the patient in remission for eight years anyway, or peacefully dying of cancer-related causes? And which is a fairer ending--for the hero to earn their independence and grow as a character, or for the hero to earn their independence and then be killed for absolutely no reason at all other than to make the story as sad as possible? I was too busy seething with rage to shed any tears for the ending.
Last edited by Jane Poirot on Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Anyone who thinks Canadians are meek and mild-mannered has obviously never seen us during Question Period!

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Post by Jane Poirot » Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:07 pm

EDIT, realized above background was white.
Anyone who thinks Canadians are meek and mild-mannered has obviously never seen us during Question Period!

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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:50 pm

I hate it when an author kills off a nice character for no reason other than to provoke some sort of emotional response. It's so cheap.

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Nine Times Nine involves a man in a yellow robe who curses Wolfe Harrigan with an ancient curse called the Nine Times Nine. Wolfe Harrigan is found murdered in a locked room after the man in the yellow robe is spotted inside. There's just a problem- he was lecturing to a group of his followers miles away! Sister Ursula, one of Boucher's detectives, investigates.
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The Egyptian Cross Mystery involves a series of bizarre murders, where the victims were decapitated and crucified in the form of a T.
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8 Faces at 3 is a book by Craig Rice- which means a rollicking adventure and a comedy of errors, in which everyone except the corpse has too much to drink. This one specifically involves the murder of an old lady- her niece is the chief suspect, but Rice's detective team is not convinced of her guilt.
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"Dance of Death introduces Basil Willing, a psychiatrist who consults with the New York Police Department after having a fairly successful practice treating shell shocked war veterans. The novel opens with a scene featuring sanitation workers who are clearing the streets after a snowstorm. One of them uncovers the body of a young debutante buried in a snow heap. At first it seems as if the novel is going to be yet another treatment of the impossible crime – the body is extremely warm and the face is stained a bright yellow two things that seem incredible after being buried in snow. The plot gets even more strange when another young woman bearing a striking resemblance to the corpse comes forward to tell a fantastic story right out of the Sherlock Holmes canon. She was asked to impersonate the dead girl at a debutante ball and the following morning was treated as if she were actually the girl she impersonated. It is here that the book begins to emphasize the psychological approach to crime solving. Willing is asked to be present at the woman's interview to determine if she is sane or not. Her relatives insist she is Kitty Jocelyn, the dead woman, but she claims she is Ann Jocelyn Claude, Kitty's cousin."
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Fri Mar 25, 2011 3:39 pm

I've now finished reading Ngaio Marsh's Off With His Head. My feelings are mixed. The solution had elements of the ingenious about it, but it wasn't entirely ingenious. Some of the clues were laughably obvious, others were expertly hidden. The set-up is highly creative, the solution is not nearly as imaginative. Still, there's enough to like in the book to warrant further investigation sometime.
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Wed Apr 06, 2011 11:28 pm

Got started on Boucher's Nine Times Nine, and it's a brilliant read- both funny and a puzzling impossible scenario at the same time. It's definitely got Carrian elements to it- it reads very much like a tribute to John Dickson Carr.

And then there are some really great lines like this:
“Because he tried to shoot me it’s a proof that he didn’t shoot my employer? You’ll pardon me, Lieutenant, if I fail to follow these brilliant deductions.�
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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Post by cacums » Fri Apr 08, 2011 7:45 pm

My best friend got me into the hunger games. I like it thus far.

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Post by CMustardwPipeinLibrary » Fri Apr 08, 2011 9:06 pm

Oh, man, Hunger Games. I've read all three books, and it's really something. Not going to spoiler anything, but the ending to each book is pretty surprising.
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Fri Apr 08, 2011 10:12 pm

I got started on Raymond Chandler's The Long Goodbye. I hated The Big Sleep and found it pathetically inept in just about every way. I also can't stand Chandler's essay The Simple Art of Murder which gets so much wrong. (To sum up his views quickly, it's basically like saying the only way a musical can become serious art would be to remove all the music.) So yeah, to date, Chandler has been the equivalent of Satan for me. But surprisingly, The Long Goodbye has gotten off to a really good start.
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:23 pm

...and then Raymond Chandler tried to be artistic.

Forget what I said about The Long Goodbye. It's veritably awful. It had a great start which would've made a great short story or novella. Now it's grasping at straws to expand it into a 400 page book. I've now passed a point in the book where I can say I hated the majority of what' i've read. I doubt I'll finish..

Satan = Chandler? No evidence in here to disprove that theory.
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:44 pm

My two Paul Halter novels arrived quite unexpectedly yesterday while I was in the middle of studying. It's very exciting to finally hold this guy's works in my hand- I can hardly wait to start reading! (But wait I must...)
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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Post by Michael » Thu Jul 21, 2011 9:28 pm

[Administrator Note: Due to a forum glitch, posts made between April 24th and July 20th have disappeared. Posts made after June 28th have been reconstructed below.]



Author: go_leafs_nation
Posted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:10 pm (GMT -6)

Another home run for a modern mystery author! After reading the likes of William DeAndrea and Bill Pronzini, it's a delight to discover Louise Penny, who is very much like a modern day Agatha Christie. The complexity is there, the villages or country houses are there, and so are the clever clues. I've read both her "impossible crime" novels: The Murder Stone (aka A Rule Against Murder) and Dead Cold (aka A Fatal Grace). Both are excellent impossible situations- The Murder Stone takes place in an isolated guest lodge, Dead Cold takes place in a Quebec village. Both are highly recommended.



Author: go_leafs_nation
Posted: Thu Jul 14, 2011 8:18 pm (GMT -6)

The books- the blog's actually been a small success. Of late I get about 200 visits per day, although my increase in activity (a post per day for a while now) may have something to do with that.



Author: Michael
Posted: Thu Jul 14, 2011 8:05 pm (GMT -6)

go_leafs_nation wrote:
Personally, I never got particularly enthusiastic over the books, but I'm the wacko with a blog on books almost nobody reads anymore...


The books or the blog?



Author: go_leafs_nation
Posted: Thu Jul 14, 2011 7:23 pm (GMT -6)

Personally, I never got particularly enthusiastic over the books, but I'm the wacko with a blog on books almost nobody reads anymore...



Author: Michael
Posted: 14 Jul 2011 07:31 pm (GMT -5.00)

I just started the second book, Catching Fire.



Author: cacums
Posted: 14 Jul 2011 11:54 am (GMT -5.00)

Yes and OMG I loved them. I actually got the opportunity to audition for a minor part in the upcoming movie. I didn't get it, but still, I felt honored to be considered for a small role



Author: Michael
Posted: 14 Jul 2011 08:18 am (GMT -5.00)

Anybody read The Hunger Games?

I LOVED it. Couldn't put it down. It's one of those future dystopia/fight-to-the-death in a bizarre government sponsored game stories.

It's a three book series, I believe. I can't wait to pick the next one up on my lunch break today.
How do you know what kind of pictures they are if you're such a lay-dee?

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go_leafs_nation
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Mon Nov 07, 2011 9:57 pm

I'm pretty surprised, looking back, at how many mysteries I've read this year. For the first month-and-a-half of the year, I read only two or three, but the number exploded and increased exponentially after I fired up my blog. It's definitely been worthwhile, although occasionally, the dreadful book rears its ugly head and threatens to spoil the fun. It's what recently happened with a book by Gilbert Adair called "The Act of Roger Murgatroyd". Complete crap that bills itself as a satire of Agatha Christie while completely misunderstanding her. So I post my review on the AC forum to warn others, and what happens? Two people respond- neither intend to read the entire review and one insists that they will now seek the book out because I've intrigued them.

...

Irony, how I hate thee.
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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