Favourite Villians

All other non-Clue/Cluedo discussion.

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CluedoKid
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Post by CluedoKid » Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:19 pm

I guess I'm the minority then.

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cacums
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Post by cacums » Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:41 pm

The top two posters don't know who this person is lol.

(which reminds me that in about 700 or so posts I'll be at 1000!)

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Jane Poirot
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Post by Jane Poirot » Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:36 pm

Doesn't ring a bell to me...when it comes to villains from less-familiar franchises, it helps to put up a name and a short description. I knew most people on here would not know who Beatrice from Umineko No Naku Koro Ni was, so I described her in a bit of detail.
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Post by PeachFreak » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:52 pm

I actually know he is, but I haven't played Tekken in a long time. It's actually a rather popular franchise, but the name would be more recognizeable than the characters.

The Ulmans from The House of the Devil because the family that sacrafices together stays together. Spoilers are below.

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Mr. Ulman: I suppose he qualifies as a villain, if a villain is anyone who is 'evil.' Consciously drawing a young woman to his home to impregnate her with the child of the devil and taking a part in the murder of a family of three seem evil enough. Though, perhaps, he's a mere pawn. He's not the most outwardly violent, and seems to be genuinely acting on behalf of his beliefs. After all, he's the only one who doesn't try to kill the protagonist, so that the baby can be born and the prophesy complete. He thinks he's doing good, but murder and drugging qualifies him as villanious enough. On another note, his "pizza on the fridge" line is wonderfully ominous.

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Mrs. Ulman: Well, this lady is much more outwardly villanious than her husband. Witty, sophisticated, charming....She seems to have played a larger role in the plan, perhaps, as the brains behind the operation. Furthermore, she physically and violently goes after the protagonist, unlike her husband. I don't doubt Mrs. Ulman would've killed our heroine if she were able. Unlike Mr. Ulman, she wants to hurt people. She isn't a mere misguided 'messenger.' Furthermore, she randomly pulls a wig off her head in the weirdest scene in the movie.

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Victor Ulman: The son of the Ulmans. Obviously the most outwardly 'evil.' He shoots and kills a girl and is the person who actually drugs the protagonist. Furthermore, he goes after her with a gun. Certainly the most outwardly aggresive. Then again, he only gives chase when prodded by mommy. So perhaps she is still the most villainous.

Mother Ulman: Physically grotesque and the performer of the impregnating ritual. She must be the obvious brains of the operation, the person plotting in the dark behind the more aggresive Mrs. Ulman. Though, it makes one wonder how the family became the cult it is. Did mother corrupt child who corrupted spouse who corrupted child? Either way, everything stems from this lady.
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Post by Adam106 » Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:42 am

Seeing as we've moved on to horror movies, Ms Tanner and Madame Blanc from Suspiria.

Tanner is the one to the left. Blanc is the one in the middle. The other one isn't given a name. Without spoiling too much, let's just say that they aren't very nice teachers.

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Post by go_leafs_nation » Thu Apr 22, 2010 9:43 pm

I haven't seen Pete's Dragon in ages, but the Gogans always managed to scare me when I was younger:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yxYpEbqd6U

The Doctor too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79vtq4nE ... re=related
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Post by Adam106 » Wed Jun 02, 2010 11:51 am

'The Other Mother' from Coraline is one of my new favourites. Love her in the book and the film.

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Post by Jane Poirot » Sat Aug 28, 2010 1:42 pm

:shock: Oh shi-

So Ep7 of the Umineko Visual Novel came out a few weeks ago, right? So I order it on-line a few days ago. And while waiting for it to arrive, I come across a rather...disturbing...spoiler regarding Beatrice's origins... :shock: The only word that can describe it is...SQUICK. No wonder she's so messed up...
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Post by Jane Poirot » Fri Sep 03, 2010 2:04 am

A while ago, I watched the anime Ookami Kakushi . I was interested because it was based on a VN by the same author who wrote Higurashi and Umineko...and I ended up being disappointed. I haven't read the VN OK is based on as it hasn't been translated into English, so maybe I just missed out on details the anime left out (according to fans, they left a LOT of stuff out), but mostly, it had too many similarities to Higurashi for my liking in the beginning and end. It stood out okay as a story by itself in the middle, but some of the main characters (with the exception of a few) weren't really that likeable, especially not the whiny protagonist.

Apart from select few members in the main cast, the villain was FAR more likeable than the protagonist...Sakaki.

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As the caption suggests, he tries waaaay too hard to be just like Light Yagami and Lelouch Lamperouge, who are both way more awesome with cunning and strategy, but this guy makes for a good villain. Some people don't like him, but he has his amount of fans, me being one of them. From the start, he is almost mysterious--what does he want with our hero, and why is he interested in this town? As time goes on (a little too quickly if you ask me), we are given the revelation that his lover was killed by the mysterious vigilante group in town who mysteriously kills certain villagers. The police refused to help or admit a murder took place; as time went on, he grew more and more bitter in his determination to find out the truth and became angered with everything associating with the village that wronged him (well, I'd be p*ssed, too).

Even when you know his motive, he is still shrouded in mystery--what are his reasons for informing the protagonist what is going on, and why is he appealing himself to the local doctor? Is he seeking revenge or compensation? If revenge is what he is after, on what scale does he seek it--against those who committed the murder, or against the entire village? Eventually, he concocts a plan that, admittedly, relies on the protagonist's stupidity (and succeeds) where he finds out the hard way what's REALLY going on, then he exposes the true nature of the group to the village.

Again, he is not on the same scale of master planning as Light or Lelouch, but he is able to make his plans work when needed, and he is the one to REALLY get the plot moving. The protagonist doesn't really do much apart from standing there, whereas Sakaki gives us actual conflict and leads not only the main characters, but also the viewer to the heart of the mystery. Were he not made out as the villain, he might as well be the actual protagonist--in fact, I think he SHOULD have been an anti-hero protagonist, or even a Villain Protagonist, instead of the one we actually got.

For some sadistic reason, part of me wanted him to win and either gain revenge, or be reunited with his lover and live happily ever after. Well...(SPOILERS): He is reunited with his lover...and then for some random reason I can't comprehend, she declares they must go down together, and they fall into a lake and, well, die. Supposedly. There are those who claim it is somehow possible Sakaki survived and escaped, and I would take this side, because he's just too good of a villain to die, you know?

In any event, he made for a good villain in an otherwise disappointing series.
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Post by Jane Poirot » Fri Sep 17, 2010 8:46 pm

I looked up some info on the VN Ookami Kakushi is based on (including PM-ing someone who had read the VN)...and I have this much to say:
1) The VN PWNS the anime
2) Poor Sakaki...I feel even sorrier for him now...he is both despicable and pitiful at the same time. You don't approve of his actions but at the same time you feel a smidgen of pity for him, you know?
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Post by go_leafs_nation » Mon Mar 14, 2011 12:04 pm

When I heard of the manga series Detective Conan (or Case Closed, as it's known over here), I was insanely skeptical. How could a comic book be any good as a mystery??? And then I read it. I am now convinced that it is the single best (modern) detective series available out there. I surprisingly like the drawing style, which to date has been the most off-putting thing about manga for me. The characters are simply delightful, with plenty of excellent humour everywhere. It doesn't linger on character angst, which it easily could have done, considering that the main character, a teenage super-detective, is turned into a grade-schooler and lives with the girl he loves, but cannot express his feelings towards her. And there's actual effort involved with the mysteries! The set-ups are often good and there's an actual plot, which can get fairly complex. Once in a while, a puzzle pops up which the non-Japanese reader cannot possibly be expected to solve, but generally speaking, there's fair play with the clues. And after the relatively weak mysteries of the opening volumes, the cases really hit their stride when the series reaches double-digits.

Which brings me to this guy:
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The Kaito Kid is a gentleman theif in the greatest tradition. He warns his victims before he strikes and makes bold, daring escapes. He is also a master of disguise, able to simulate anyone's voice and with realistic-looking costumes, faces, and so on. He is basically a kick-@ss, awesome, artistic supercriminal-- all the imagination of Golden Age mysteries is unleashed through his character. I thought it was a lost thing, but Gosho Aoyama seems to have discovered that magic touch.

In the story I just read, there's plenty of awesome stuff. First, the Kaito Kid announces that he will steal a valuable black pearl on April 1st, writing a cryptic note in which he announces the route he will take to get to the museum it is in and so on. The main character Jimmy Kudo (forced to assume the pseudonym Conan Edogawa after he is turned into a six-year old) foils his plan, but Kaito Kid is not in the least bit worried. He himself encourages the police to come to the rooftop on which he is cornered, and when told he will go to prison, he smiles and boldly announces he had no intention of stealing the pearl that night- he was simply testing the response of the police. "After all, I said 'April Fools!'", he shouts, before dropping an explosive of sorts which flashes brilliantly. Afterwards, the Kid has completely vanished from the rooftop...

The solution to the impossible disappearance is brilliantly simple, and it is only one of the puzzles in the volume, which is tremendous fun and probably the best of the series to date. I highly recommend the entire series (or at least what I've read so far), even though the first few volumes have fairly weak mysteries- the characters elevate it to a whole new level, and the basic premise of the series is established therein.
The two women exchanged the kind of glance women use when no knife is handy.
~Ellery Queen
At the Scene of the Crime

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Green
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Post by Green » Thu Mar 17, 2011 2:32 am

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Mother Gothel, anyone?

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Post by Jane Poirot » Thu Apr 14, 2011 8:35 pm

Just saw that movie today--love it. :D

As for my newest contribution...yes, another anime/manga example, but this one is perfect. Today, I finished reading the manga Monster , and I loved it (still watching the anime, but so far it's pretty faithful to its source material). The villain is the titular monster, and the best example of a villain who is extremely evil and has no sympathetic or redeeming qualities whatsoever, yet has a certain amount of charisma that you can't totally hate him for his deeds, yet feel revile and disgust for them (like the Joker, except without his black humour). At the same time, however, he is a deconstruction of an irredemably evil villain as the series shows how such a person could come to be.

That villain...is Johan Liebert.

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Monster is about a doctor who saves the life of a young boy who grows up to become a remorseless serial killer. Feeling responsible for the terror he unleashed onto the world, the doctor spends the series tracking Johan down to stop him once and for all...even if it means compromising his ethics, which he constantly struggles with.

Are all lives equal, even those of extreme monsters? This is a question toyed with throughout the series over and over. To give you a good idea of just how truly evil Johan is...the first murder you see him commit on-screen as an adult is shooting a man who screams that he doesn't want to die. And this is actually the least horrifying thing he does in the entire series. Get the general picture? Should a person like that be killed, or otherwise prevented from harming society without means of murder? It's up to the reader to draw their own conclusions, but as for what the series ultimately settles for...

I don't want to give it away even in white spoilers, nor do I want to give away his background, as later on in the series you learn pieces of Johan's background and begin to form the bigger picture of who he is, and who he was.
Anyone who thinks Canadians are meek and mild-mannered has obviously never seen us during Question Period!

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